The PublicHealth@Cambridge network is a multi-disciplinary community for public health research across Cambridge.

“Public health is the science and art of promoting and protecting the health and well-being of whole populations, preventing ill-health and prolonging life through the organised efforts of society.”

Early detection and treatment of type 2 diabetes may reduce heart disease and mortality

Screening to identify type 2 diabetes followed by early treatment could result in substantial health benefits, according to new research published today by the MRC Epidemiology Unit, University of Cambridge.

Read full story Comments are closed

2015 Network Showcase, 8th June

The 2015 PublicHealth@Cambridge Network showcase event is taking place on Monday 8th June at the Kaetsu Centre, Murray Edwards College. Register now to secure your free place at this event and submit your abstract for a lightning talk or poster.

Read full story Comments are closed

Head of Department elected Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences

Congratulations to Professor John Danesh, Head of the Department of Public Health and Primary Care at the University of Cambridge, who has been elected a Fellow of the Academy of Medical Sciences.

Read full story Comments are closed

Forests could play a vital role in efforts to end global hunger

About one in nine people globally still suffer from hunger, but the world’s forests have great potential to improve their nutrition and ensure their livelihoods. In fact, forests and forestry are essential to achieving food security as the limits of boosting agricultural production become increasingly clear, according to a new report released today.

Read full story Comments are closed

Replacing one sugary drink per day could cut diabetes risk

New research from Cambridge shows that drinking water or unsweetened tea or coffee in place of one sugary drink per day can reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Read full story Comments are closed

Fast food takeaways grow more rapidly in poorest areas

The number of takeaway food outlets has risen substantially over the past two decades, with a large increase seen in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage, according to a study carried out across Norfolk by researchers at the University of Cambridge.

Read full story Comments are closed
Skip to toolbar