The PublicHealth@Cambridge network is building a multi-disciplinary community for public health research across Cambridge.

“Public health is the science and art of promoting and protecting the health and well-being of whole populations, preventing ill-health and prolonging life through the organised efforts of society.”

Cambridge diagnostic tool offers on-the-spot HIV testing to millions living with HIV in Africa

A new transformative point-of-care diagnostic which gives instant results for the detection of genetic material from the HIV virus is being rolled out across Africa. The small, highly portable machine – known as SAMBA II – will help transform the lives of millions, especially HIV exposed infants who have a one in two chance of early death if HIV infection is not diagnosed within the first six weeks of life and if they are not immediately initiated on treatment.

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Zero-tolerance approach to MRSA “unachievable”, study suggests

Analysis of a supposed outbreak of MRSA in a Cambridge hospital raises questions about whether the superbug can be completely eradicated, despite a national policy of zero-tolerance.

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New study finds overall physical activity is increased by proximity to routes

Providing, high-quality, traffic-free cycling and walking routes in local communities has encouraged more people to get about by foot and by bike, according to a new study published today in the American Journal of Public Health.

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One in three cases of Alzheimer’s worldwide potentially preventable, new estimate suggests

A third of Alzheimer’s disease cases worldwide can be attributed to risk factors that can be potentially modified, such as lack of education and physical inactivity, according to NIHR-funded research published in The Lancet Neurology today.

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Inherited ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy may be limited to children and grandchildren

When a pregnant mother is undernourished, her child is at a greater than average risk of developing obesity and type 2 diabetes, in part due to so-called ‘epigenetic’ effects. A new study in mice demonstrates that this ‘memory’ of nutrition during pregnancy can be passed through sperm of male offspring to the next generation, increasing risk of disease for her grandchildren as well – in other words, to adapt an old maxim, ‘you are what your grandmother ate’.

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H1N1 virus 'swine flu'

New analysis of ‘swine flu’ pandemic conflicts with accepted views on how diseases spread

New analysis of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in the US shows that the pandemic wave was surprisingly slow, and that its spread was likely accelerated by school-age children

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